Some pilots know . . .

Deep system knowledge is only needed on rare occasions. Unfortunately those occasions, when things break, when checklists and abnormal procedures are not enough, tend to require you have that knowledge NOW. Dr. Nicklas Dahlström is Human Factors Manager at Emirates, and a former researcher at Lund University School of Aviation in Sweden. Quote from his presentation at the 69th International Air Safety Summit, 2016.

Wake? Wait!

The standard advice to avoid a wake turbulence encounter is to wait a bit, to give some room when taking off or landing right behind a large aircraft. And that is good, practical, physics-based advice. But what about when you hit wake turbulence and have to recover? What’s being rediscovered is when actually encountering serious wake turbulence, the best thing to do is: Nothing. Well, not just nothing, but initially just wait. That’s right, wait. You may be rapidly going inverted but don’t do anything yet. Breathe for a second. Resist the strong urge from our primal flying nature to quickly move the … Continue reading Wake? Wait!